Former Pubmaster boss launches finance agency

Start a new threadBy The PMA Team , 04-Sep-2008

Related topics: Company & City News

John Sands, who last month quit as non-executive chairman of the London Town pub company, has set up the London-based Delphi Partnership.

Former Pubmaster boss John Sands has launched a new corporate finance consultancy.

 

Sands, who last month quit as non-executive chairman of the London Town pub company, has set up the Delphi Partnership, which is based in London.

 

It may also develop a venture capital arm if the right investment opportunities come along.

 

Sands said: "Delphi was launched last Thursday and we already have our first client who we are working with in a restructuring capacity.

 

"The key to what we offer our potential clients is the broad base of business experience and expertise of the members of the partnership."

 

Jonathan Garbett, former joint chief executive of the Dawnay Day, Stephen Morris, chief executive officer of Haygarth marketing communications agency, and Jack Bowyer, former boss of the Hampshire brewer George Gales, make up the rest of the Delphi team.

 

Sands said: "We will operate across all sectors in the field of corporate finance and advice including M&A activity, restructuring and equity and debt finance."

 

Sands is also involved in the north east-based Wear Inns.

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