Simmonds steps down as BISL boss

Start a new threadBy Ewan Turney , 07-Jul-2009

Related topics: General News, Company & City News

Brigid Simmonds has stepped down as chief executive of Business In Sport and Leisure (BISL) following a "business plan review".

Simmonds: well-known industry figure

Simmonds: well-known industry figure

Brigid Simmonds has stepped down as chief executive of Business In Sport and Leisure (BISL) following a "business plan review".

 

Simmonds, a well respected figure in the industry, is to be replaced by executive director Andy Sutch. Neil Goulden has also stepped down as chairman to be replaced by David Teasdale, previously vice chairman.

 

BISL, the umbrella body representing the private sector in sport and leisure, said it had reviewed its plans as "part of the challenging business climate". The BISL board accepted Teasdale's new business plan, which calls for a new manifesto, to be agreed by members.

 

"It's an honour to follow in the distinguished footsteps of BISL Chairmen Neil Goulden and John Brackenbury," said Teasdale.

 

"Brigid Simmonds will also be a hard act to follow.

 

"We are in very important times for our industry, with an election looming, and the London Olympics ahead. BISL's leadership and expertise are needed more than ever, to keep making the case for sport and leisure."

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