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Wi-Fi boost for Heineken stockists

View postBy John Harrington, M&C Report , 23-Aug-2011

Related topics: General News

Wifi: increasingly important for pubs

Wifi: increasingly important for pubs

Heineken UK is to rollout free Wi-Fi to 500 "beacon" Heineken stockist bars over the next 18 months.

 

It's part of a tie-in with BT and The Independent, which is expected to mean extra publicity for the bars through mentions in the newspaper. Heineken field sales staff will select venues they deem to be "beacon" Heineken stockists.

 

The Wi-Fi service is free to both venues and customers, who will be able to receive a special newsfeed from The Independent's digital offshoot i. And customers won't need to log in to the system to access the internet.

 

A special app will also be accessible to all smartphone, tablet and laptop users in participating venues.

 

A print and digital campaign is set to support the scheme. "The activity will drive readers of the paper to pubs and bars and boost awareness of the Heineken initiative," the brewer said.

 

The partnership will include month-ly competitions that the company hopes will encourage revisits to Heineken Hub outlets. Prizes will include new gadgets and technology.

 

Venues that take part will also receive extra training on the perfect serve and other help, including extra PoS.

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