Tribunal says dismissal of manager was unfair

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Grievous bodily harm, Bodily harm

by Richard Matthews A former pub manager, who was wrongly accused of having a conviction for grievous bodily harm and gave up a tenancy after being...

by Richard Matthews A former pub manager, who was wrongly accused of having a conviction for grievous bodily harm and gave up a tenancy after being promised a manager's position, has won a case for unfair dismissal. Teresa Davies told an industrial tribunal she agreed to a request from Voyager to give up a tenancy in order to concentrate on managing another pub but then found herself dismissed without her knowledge. Davies claims to have regularly sorted out problems at some of East London's most troublesome pubs for her company and also trained other managers. But the tribunal was told her employers had attempted to classify her as a temporary member of the retail bar staff at the Alfred's Head in Chigwell, even though she was being paid £495 a week. The tribunal, sitting in Stratford, ruled that Davies, who is currently out of work and suffering from depression as a result of the conflict, was unfairly dismissed from the pub in an action contested by both Six Continents Retail and the Voyager Pub Group. The tribunal ruled there had not been a substantial reason for her dismissal and the situation had been complicated by the lack of contractual agreements. A subsequent hearing will decide the scale of compensation to which she is entitled and also address the issue of costs. The pub, where her husband John had also previously been manager, had first been operated by Six Continents and then Voyager. The tribunal heard that after being asked to take over from her husband as manager, police pointed out that she had a conviction for grevious bodily harm ­ a claim that was later dropped with Davies receiving a full and unreserved apology. She said she agreed to a request from Voyager's retail business manager to give up her tenancy of the Britannia at Leytonstone and hold the licence of the Alfred's Head on her husband's licence with the promise of an offer of a manager's position somewhere else. It was some months later she had discovered she had been dismissed, even though she had been on an agreed holiday. "I gave up a tenancy to help out the company because they thought there was a conflict of interest, and I had fully expected to be offered another pub. "And then I found I was being treated as a member of the retail bar staff instead," she said.

Related topics: Licensing law

Property of the week

Follow us

Pub Trade Guides

View more