Off-trade lager sold at 33p a unit on average, study shows

By James Wilmore

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Minimum price, Alcoholic beverage, Price

Ninety-one per cent of alcohol units sold as lager in the off-trade in 2007 were sold below 45p a unit, a study has revealed. The Institute of...

Ninety-one per cent of alcohol units sold as lager in the off-trade in 2007 were sold below 45p a unit, a study has revealed.

The Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) report into minimum pricing showed that 85 per cent of all alcohol units - covering every drinks category - were also sold below this level.

On average a unit of lager was sold at 33p in shops and supermarkets, while cider was sold at just 25p a unit.

The figures emerged as the IFS estimated that a 45p minimum price would mean UK stores and producers would net an extra £700m.

The Scottish government is still trying to push through a minimum price of 45p a unit, but looks set to fail.

And south of the border the coalition continues to face calls to bring in a minimum price.

But the IFS has called instead for alcohol taxes to be "restructured" so they are based on strength.

"Higher taxes would generate much needed revenue," said Andrew Leicester, an IFS senior research economist said.

"The government should seek to change European regulations on how alcohol taxes can be structured, so that taxes can mimic the impact of minimum prices whilst ensuring the resulting revenues go to the government and not firms."

Related topics: Beer

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