BBPA launches new scheme for brewers to cut cost of packaging waste

By Ellie Bothwell contact

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Recycling

Brigid Simmonds: '[This is a] major opportunity for us to work together, to make very significant cost savings, promote recycling and protect the environment'
Brigid Simmonds: '[This is a] major opportunity for us to work together, to make very significant cost savings, promote recycling and protect the environment'
Wells & Youngs and Hook Norton have signed up to a new packaging compliance scheme from the British Beer & Pub Association (BBPA), to cut the cost of waste.

The BBPA said its SUSTAIN initiative will provide an estimated cost reduction of 17% for the average member – which equates to around £150,000 per year, per company.

It will do this by reducing the cost of Packaging Recovery Notes (PRNs), documents that provide evidence that waste packaging material has been recycled into a new product, under the Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 2007.

The scheme will operate as a not-for-profit partnership and use in-house experts to achieve “lowest cost compliance with the highest standards of data reporting”.

It will also provide sector-specific support as scheme members will have a direct influence on the future of how the sector’s packaging compliance is managed. The industry’s recycling achievements can also be measured and promoted under the scheme. 

'Growing issue'

BBPA chief executive Brigid Simmonds said: “We have taken action to set up SUSTAIN, as we have a  major opportunity for us to work together, to make very significant cost savings, promote recycling and protect the environment.

“Packaging waste is going to be a growing issue, with EU proposals for higher targets on the horizon. I anticipate that many BBPA members will be rapidly looking to join the SUSTAIN partnership, and we have urged all our members to do so.”

Related topics: Beer

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1 comment

Waste costs

Posted by David Pott,

As the pubs end up having to dispose of the bottles and the packaging. Which on the whole go into landfill due to the expense of recycling.
How exactly are the producers going to reduce this wastage?

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