Alcohol consumption falls by 18% in a decade

By James Wallin, M&C Report

- Last updated on GMT

Despite the fact total alcohol consumption fell, beer's share of the market rose by 1%
Despite the fact total alcohol consumption fell, beer's share of the market rose by 1%

Related tags: Alcohol consumption, Alcoholic beverage, British beer & pub association

The latest figures show alcohol consumption fell again in 2014 – for the eighth year in the past 10 – while beer increased its share of the market.

The figures compiled by the British Beer & Pub Association from HMRC data shows total alcohol consumption down 0.3% in 2014 with consumption per head now 18.4% lower than it was in 2004.

However beer’s share of the market rose in 2014, by 1%, to over 36% – with second-placed wine slipping below 33%. Spirits share of the market held steady, at 21%, with cider at 8%.

Beer brought in £3.36bn in beer duties in 2014, up 1.8% compared with the previous year.

BBPA chief executive Brigid Simmonds said: “While the figures certainly bury the myth that overall UK alcohol consumption is inexorably rising, it is hugely encouraging to see such a solid performance from beer in 2014.

“There is no doubt that two cuts in beer duty have had a huge impact in supporting a British-based industry and in encouraging consumers back towards our favourite, lower-strength drink .

“With new investment in the beer category protecting pubs and creating jobs, it all adds to an overwhelming case for a third, historic cut in beer duty in the Budget on 18 March.”

Year

Litres of alcohol per head per year

Change on previous year

1998

7.95

 

1999

8.32

4.6%

2000

8.42

1.3%

2001

8.74

3.8%

2002

9.07

3.8%

2003

9.21

1.5%

2004

9.51

3.3%

2005

9.35

-1.7%

2006

9.04

-3.3%

2007

9.16

1.3%

2008

8.88

-3.1%

2009

8.34

-6.1%

2010

8.36

0.2%

2011

8.16

-2.4%

2012

7.92

-2.9%

2013

7.78

-1.8%

2014

7.76

-0.3%

Related topics: Legislation

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9 comments

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An industry in potential meltdown?

Posted by david,

For the last 12 months I have been working with 17 to 20-year olds, and it has been an absolute revelation in getting an in-depth insight into the attitudes and interests of that age group.

I wouldn't say that alcohol doesn't figure in their lives, but pubs hardly appear on their socialising radar - either for eating or drinking.

Technology and social media seem to totally dominate their lives, and a surprising number would rather splash out on the latest iphone or on a trip to London or Barcelona than fritter away their money in a pub. I've lost count of the number of times I've heard the phrase "I don't want to finish up looking like my Mom/Dad"!!

Not a good sign for the future of the great British pub. Perhaps they'll think differently when they get to 50+

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Licensing Act - longer hours yes -

Posted by Graham Bell,

and now we have paid the price. Higher overhead costs + higher taxes = higher SP or lower GP. Result - more customers have stayed at home. Government win 1-0 with no chance of a replay.

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Alcohol Consumption and the Licensing Act

Posted by John Ellis,

It seems that Alcohol Consumption rose inexorably up to 2004. Then with the 2003 Licensing Act taking effect in 2005, consumption has since plummeted. Surely this was the Government's real agenda. They must be thinking they've succeeded!

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