Licensed Trade

Need a lawyer?..professional service providers you need

Professional services

Need a lawyer?..professional service providers you need

By Fiona McLelland

You’re probably in the business because you love running your own pub. Not for the love of paperwork, legalities and accounts. That’s where professional service providers come in. 

Licensed Trade Charity launches sickness guidance

Guidance

Licensed Trade Charity launches sickness guidance

By Ellie Bothwell

The Licensed Trade Charity has launched new guidance to help prevent long-term sick and disabled people working in the licensed trade getting into financial problems.

Regular stocktaking is vital for any licensed trade outlet to

How using a stocktaker can help your pub

By ILTSA

You wouldn’t dream of buying a new car and not having it serviced by a competent mechanic, so why take such chances with your business? A stocktaker can provide advice on a regular basis at a reasonable cost. The Institute of Licensed Trade Stock Auditors...

Coulson: no substitute for careful checking

The high cost of shoddy advice

By Peter Coulson

Be wary of the number of advisers and agents, all promising to save you money or sort out your financial problems, says Peter Coulson.

Coulson: benefits hinge on obligation to reside on the premises

Taxation of live-in benefits

By Peter Coulson

Peter Coulson clears up the grey area over live-in benefits for licensees living above their pub.

Coulson: trade under too much pressure

Home Office runs a self-fulfilling prophecy

By Peter Coulson

In my time working with the licensed trade, I have never known it to be under so much pressure to comply with rules and regulations, says Peter Coulson.

Coercion in disguise

Coercion in disguise

By Peter Coulson

The idea of "voluntary" agreements has been around for a long time in the licensed trade, and has not improved with age. The latest, in Rotherham,...

Coulson: innocent condemned with guilty

Keeping a sense of proportion

By Peter Coulson

Alcohol retailing is being slowly demonised, presented as an industry that requires almost a strait-jacket of laws to keep it controlled, says Peter Coulson.