Starters - Crimes Against Food

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Related tags: Steak, Meat

Crimes Against Food
Crimes Against Food
Steak not cooked to order. How many times have you been asked how you would like your steak by the waiter, only to find this lost in translation by...

Steak not cooked to order. How many times have you been asked how you would like your steak by the waiter, only to find this lost in translation by the time your prime piece of fillet or rump hits the table.

If you know it is not cooked to order don't send it out. When cooked to perfection a steak is up there in many people's top meal choices, so it is worth getting it spot on, as they will return. The wrong steak problem is often exacerbated by the waiting staff who can act like sulky teenagers if you point out it is not cooked to order. It is the chef's problem not the customer's, so go and be all Kevin-the-teenager with them. The Meat & Livestock Commission has produced a guide called Cooking the Perfect Steak. It includes information on steak specification, cooking and serving. The guide offers the following different terms for the way in which steak can be cooked:

Very rare​ or "blue" steak (au bleu) is cooked for only a matter of seconds on each side. Rare​ (saignant) - the cooked meat has a reddish tinge. Medium​ (à point) - the cooked meat is very slightly pink. Well done​ (bien cuit) - the meat is thoroughly cooked throughout so there is no sign of pinkness.

Recent research by the MLC also reconfirms the view that it is safe to serve your customers rare steaks.

For more information visit www.mlcfoodservice.com

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