Glass: police ignore Government's line

By Joe Lutrario joe.lutrario@william-reed.co.uk

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Blanket glass bans, Glass, Newport

Police are continuing to call for blanket glass bans despite advice to the contrary from the Government, published in its National Alcohol Strategy....

Police are continuing to call for blanket glass bans despite advice to the contrary from the Government, published in its National Alcohol Strategy.

The strategy, released last week, called for "risk-based, rather than a blanket approach" to requiring venues to go glass-free. But police forces contacted by the MA say they will continue to press for blanket bans.

Northampton Police Sergeant Mark Worthingham said: "As far as the town centre goes, we'd still push for polycarbonates in high-volume vertical drinking venues.

"We would certainly consider the enforcement route in venues that have a history of glassings, whatever their location. But most of the time we find that they make the switch without licensing reviews being mentioned."

Inspector Talbot Thrush of Gwent Police said: "Fifty per cent of glassing attacks in Gwent occur within Newport city centre; 28 people were glassed in the region last year - more than two a month.

"I'm still pursuing a policy of banning glass after 8pm across Newport town centre. I believe this will seriously reduce the number of people affected by attacks."

More than 2,500 people have now signed the MA's on-line petition to Prime Minister Tony Blair opposing blanket glass bans.

Visit thttp://petitions.pm.gov.uk/plasticglass/ to add your name.

In addition, 40 MPs have put their name to the Early Day Motion against blanket bans, drafted by the MA and submitted by All-Party Parliamentary Beer Group chairman John Grogan.

Health chiefs dismiss risks

Possible health risks through dioxin "leaching" from polycarbonate drinking glasses have been dismissed by health chiefs.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has moved to reassure drinkers that levels of Bisphenol A, used in the production of plastic glasses, are entirely within prescribed safety levels.

An American study into chemicals leaching from polycarbonate consumer products revealed a presence of Bisphenol A, which is transferred into liquids and foodstuffs stored in the containers.

But the FSA says levels of Bisphenol A are well within the "tolerable daily amount" (TDI) people can take without suffering any health effects. US scientists have linked doses of Bisphenol A to exposure to cancers, obesity, diabetes and hyperactivity.

Earlier this year the FSA raised the permissible TDI amount to 0.05 milligrams per kilogram of bodyweight.

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Related topics: Legislation

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