New powers to curb alcohol related crime

By Gemma McKenna

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Home office minister, Police, Government

New powers for police
New powers for police
The Government has today announced a new power that targets offenders who commit crime under the influence of alcohol. Home Office Minister Alan...

The Government has today announced a new power that targets offenders who commit crime under the influence of alcohol.

Home Office Minister Alan Campbell announced that from next summer, Drinking Banning Orders will allow police and local authorities to stop a person entering premises if they have been involved in criminal or disorderly conduct under the influence of alcohol.

Breach of an order, which can last up to two years, can lead to a fine of up to £2,500. The orders are focused on people whose drinking has been identified as a factor in their disorderly conduct.

The Government also published new guidance on obtaining Designated Public Place Orders (DPPOs) and establishing Alcohol Disorder Zones. DPPOs allow police and local authorities to confiscate alcohol in public places, and command individuals in that area to stop drinking.

Campbell said: "The Government has given police and local authorities a wide range of tools and powers to tackle alcohol fuelled crime. We have recently given police forces and councils across England and Wales a cash boost of £4.5 million to deal with specific local problems.

He called for councils and police to employ new measures only as a "last resort".

Mike Craik, Association of Chief Police Officers national spokesperson for alcohol and licensing, welcomed the new funding and said: "The ability to take action against these problematic people by preventing them from entering certain places is something forces up and down the country can work with in future."

Hazel Harding, chair of the Local Government Association Safer Communities Board, said: "Drink fuelled antisocial behaviour is a major concern for many councils and this power is a necessary step in helping them deal with it. But she added. "it remains to be seen how they will be enforced."

Don Shenker, chief executive of Alcohol Concern, national alcohol misuse charity, said: "If used as part of a package of measures to reduce alcohol harms these initiatives can make a real difference to safety on our streets."

Related topics: Licensing law

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