MP to launch own mandatory code consultation

By James Wilmore

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Prime minister of the united kingdom, Sally keeble

A Labour MP is launching her own "wider" public consultation on the government's controversial alcohol mandatory code of practice. Sally Keeble, MP...

A Labour MP is launching her own "wider" public consultation on the government's controversial alcohol mandatory code of practice.

Sally Keeble, MP for Northampton North, has invited Home Office minister Alan Campbell to host a launch of her online consultation in Parliament on April 27.

An official government public consultation on the code is also due, but a Home Office spokesman said there was currently "no official date".

Keeble, who tabled a Ten Minute Rule Bill on alcohol promotions last year which led to a reception at 10 Downing Street, said she hoped the results of her survey would "feed in" to the government's official exercise.

"The idea is to get members of the general public to respond to see what they want and how to tackle the issues," she said.

"The questions will be a lot wider and not constrained by what might be in the code".

The code, being drawn up as part of the policing and crime bill, is likely to include nine national mandatory conditions, covering alcohol sales.

It is due to include a crackdown on irresponsible promotions, such as "all you can drink" and "women drink free" nights, and could see pubs being forced to offer 125ml wine measures.

Keeble said feedback she had received from the public suggested people were concerned with on-trade promotions, but they also realised a "big problem" was "very cheap" deals in the off-trade.

The MP said she was also a still keen backer of minimum pricing, despite Gordon Brown snubbing the idea. "It's the only logical way forward that will not affect traditional drinking habits, such as in pubs," she said.

"Minimum pricing is a difficult policy and it's something that would take a long-time to get public acceptance. But it needs explaining that it will not affect the price of a pint in a pub for people."

Related topics: Legislation

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