Pubs face police checks over toughened glass

By James Wilmore

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Toughened glass, Glass

Pubs in Strathclyde, Scotland, face police checks on whether they are using toughened glass, after new equipment was unveiled. And pubs with a...

Pubs in Strathclyde, Scotland, face police checks on whether they are using toughened glass, after new equipment was unveiled.

And pubs with a history of problems are being warned they will face a review of their licence if they are found not complying.

The new equipment - a polariscope - will allow police to check whether glasses have been toughened.

The polariscope was unveiled yesterday in Glasgow at an event attended by Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill.

"The new Licensing Act enables licensing boards to apply conditions requiring the use of plastic or toughened glass and we fully support and encourage boards taking tough action in this area as they see fit," said MacAskill.

In 2009, there were 52 glassing attacks in the Strathclyde area, police said.

Chief Superintendent Ruaraidh Nicolson, of Strathclyde Police, said the equipment would "help us carry out checks in premises where there have been violent incidents involving glass".

He said: "We appreciate that not every glass can be toughened or plastic but where it is available, we would expect it to be used."

But he added: "Any future incidents on licensed premises involving non-toughened glassware where serious injuries are inflicted, are likely to lead to an application to the relevant licensing board for a premises review under the crime prevention and public safety objectives of the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005."

Cllr Stephen Dornan, chairman of Glasgow Licensing Board, said the use of toughened glass had been a "big success" and helped cut injuries from glassings.

"We hope the use of this simple device will encourage more licensees to make the change to a safer kind of glass," he said.

Paul Waterson, the Scottish Licensed Trade Association's chief executive, has previously said the move towards toughened glass in Strathclyde was a "positive" step.

However, Patrick Browne, chief executive of the Scottish Beer & Pub Association, said the group was against toughened glass "being imposed on pubs on a mandatory basis".

"It should be done on a case-by-case basis," he said. However he agreed it should be used in high risk venues.

Related topics: Licensing law

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