CAMRA

CAMRA:10 reasons why licensees shouldn't fear an ACV listing

By Emily Sutherland contact

- Last updated on GMT

CAMRA explains why you should be listed as an asset of community value

Related tags: Public house

Getting your pub listed as an Asset of Community Value is a positive thing for your pub according to the Campaign for Real Ale.

Here, CAMRA lists the top ten reasons it thinks an ACV letter dropping through the door is a cause for celebration and not fear for licensees. 

Despite the doomsaying, the initial delay on development or sale of an ACV listed pub is just six weeks - that's much shorter than the time it usually takes for solicitors to complete a sale and all legal and financial processes can continue throughout the moratorium period. The moratorium period only extends to six months if a community group expresses a wish to buy the pub - and that sale can take place within those six months.

1. Despite the doomsaying, the initial delay on development or sale of an ACV listed pub is just six weeks - that's much shorter than the time it usually takes for solicitors to complete a sale and all legal and financial processes can continue throughout the moratorium period. The moratorium period only extends to six months if a community group expresses a wish to buy the pub - and that sale can take place within those six months.

2. Pubs sold as going concerns are not subject to the moratorium, so there is no delay in cases where the purchaser fully intends to keep the pub open.

3. An ACV listing can be considered as a quality accreditation which confirms your pub is valued by the local people and a part of community life. This can be used to promote the pub when selling it as a going concern, or with the right marketing, increase trade.

4. If you are selling your pub, an ACV listing gives you access to a group of people who value your pub and may consider buying it - with no agents fees.

5. If you are a tenant of a pub company then ACV status can prevent your pub being sold to a property developer without you being informed - and give you the opportunity to bid for the pub yourself.

6. Getting listed as an ACV often starts a conversation between the licensee and the community groups who listed the pub - which could lead to working together to increase business.

7. An ACV listing can be used as evidence that the pub is valued and supported by the local community, which may help when licensees are applying to alter licensing hours or applying for planning permission to extend to increase viability.

8. CAMRA is campaigning for ACV listed pubs to be given enhanced support by councils and Government - including pushing for the extension of business rate relief for ACV listed pubs.

9. Getting listed as an ACV pub gives you a great story to secure valuable positive publicity in local media - as well as getting mentioned in CAMRA publications.

10. CAMRA will be supporting ACV listed pubs with a welcome pack for pubs awarded ACV status, along with a window sticker to advertise how valued they are to the community.

Related topics: Legislation

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6 comments

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ACV

Posted by david,

No idea where Alan is coming from with his "all the ACV did was made us close the pub as there became no chance of selling".

A pub being listed as an ACV has no impact on its sale prospects as a going concern. There is no moratorium and no hindrance to its sale. Its value is not degraded and its appeal to someone wanting to buy it as a going concern is not reduced.

Presumably Alan bought it as a pub, and if it trades successfully it will sell as a pub. If Alan has improved its business performance he should return a profit on its goodwill value, and if he has improved the property and/or F&F he should at least recover his investment.

As Ian and Michael have said, ACV status only has relevance to someone wanting to sell it or buy it for alternate use. That's the whole idea of ACVs.

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Yep it is tosh...really

Posted by Alan,

Pleased to see you read the post (or not) Michael. As stated the pub is on the market at well below the market price as we really did want to sell, and as it happens to sell as a pub. In this real world some times it is not going to happen, all the ACV did was made us close the pub as there became no chance of selling. that's life we now live in a very large building that we cannot us half of.. But Michael i'm sure you have no clue about pub world so lets leave it at that.

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Off Topic

Posted by Interested Observer,

Not only are we being denied the opportunity to comment on most stories - other ACV articles, EI, Sky, BT and the new Minister for example - but even on this thread at least one seemingly innocuous comment has been removed making the next comment baffling to the newly arrived.

If the editorial team are reading this - perhaps no forum at all would be better than this apparently haphazard and unpredictable censorship.

On the topic I think it's a matter of simple valuation theory; a property with restrictions will always be valued at less than the identical property unrestricted.

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