You’re all pouring pints wrong, says New York beer sommelier

By James Beeson contact

- Last updated on GMT

Pour effort: a pint with a large head may feel like a rip off but is a sign that a beer has been properly poured
Pour effort: a pint with a large head may feel like a rip off but is a sign that a beer has been properly poured
The established convention of tilting a glass when pouring a pint of beer could be leaving drinkers bloated and uncomfortable, according to an American beer sommelier.

Master Cicerone and AB InBev educator Max Bakker argues that by tilting the glass and pouring a beer slowly, servers trap carbon dioxide (CO2) in the beer, which then goes straight into the stomach of the drinker.

The problem is exacerbated by eating food after drinking, as food will disturb the liquid and cause it to start releasing the CO2, Bakker claims.

Generous head

According to Bakker, bartenders or drinkers at home would be better off pouring with vigour, even if this leaves a significant head on the beer.

In a video for Business Insider​, Bakker pours a beer vigorously and comments: “In this foam is where we're going to taste the sweetness of the malt and the bitterness of the hops, but really it's going to protect the integrity of the aroma that's underneath that foam through each sip.”

Bakker claims that the ideal pint of beer should be poured with a generous head, but many pubs are scared of doing this because consumer perception of the ideal glass of beer is wrong.

Expert sommelier

Bakker is one of only 13 people in the world to become a Master Cicerone. The exam challenges individuals to master every technical and aesthetic aspect of beer, and costs $995 (£735) to sit.

BrewDog co-founder James Watt also holds the title of Master Cicerone.

Meanwhile an online petition has been launched​ to restore the crown emblem to British pint glasses, in a move supporters say will “restore faith” in Brexit in a similar fashion to the return of the blue passport.

The author of the petition, John Davies, claims the move would “symbolise the restoration of UK sovereignty” prior to the UK leaving the EU in March 2019.

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