No 'one female palate' for World Cup watchers in pubs

By Emily Hawkins contact

- Last updated on GMT

Avoid assumptions: 'ensure you have a varied range of beer styles available, such as a wheat beer, a sour, a fruit beer' Dea Latis' Annabel Smith and Lisa Harlow advise
Avoid assumptions: 'ensure you have a varied range of beer styles available, such as a wheat beer, a sour, a fruit beer' Dea Latis' Annabel Smith and Lisa Harlow advise

Related tags: Sport, Drinks

Sport pub and fan network MatchPint are reminding operators not fall into gendered drinking stereotypes during this summer's Women’s World Cup.

The football tournament, which kicks off on 7 June, has been touted as an opportunity for pubs to build on the momentum brought to the sector by the success of the England men's team last summer. 

A recent survey from MatchPint has revealed that lager is the most popular drink for 62% of both male and female viewers of women’s sport, with the drink's popularity increasing to 67% when female respondents’ answers were taken in isolation.

A varied beer offer

Speakers at a MatchPint pre-tournament briefing for the pub industry recommended operators avoid making gendered assumptions​ by focusing on their gin and wine offers.

Annabel Smith and Lisa Harlow, from women and beer interest group Dea Latis, shared a number of tips for publicans, for example having a variety of beers on offer on match days and to use inclusive advertising. 

They advised that pubs should not focus completely on lager. "There are other styles of beer which appeal to women," they explained. 

“Ensure you have a varied range of beer styles available, such as a wheat beer, a sour, a fruit beer. It’s not all about lager and ale!"

The tournament could be a great chance to encourage new and returning customers to try beer, Smith and Harlow added.

"[Do not] make assumptions that all women will want gin or wine: this is an opportunity to encourage women to try beer.

"Brief staff to offer 'Try Before You Buy' samples on the range of beers. Sampling is an effective form of encouraging women to try something different to their usual tipple."

They added that flights of beer, sampler trays with a third of a pint, offer an opportunity to try different styles of beer without the commitment to a full pint.

Glassware is crucial 

Getting the right beer in the right glass is also crucial, according to Dea Latis. "Product presentation is key for women," they said.

The group's The Beer Agender​ report, which examined why a large proportion of UK women are disinterested or hold negative ideas about drinking beer, found women valued sophisticated glassware.

A spokesperson from The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) agreed and argued that variety was key to getting a World Cup drinks offer right.

They explained: "Pubs should consider putting on a range of real ales for the games and allow tastings to give people the chance to find the perfect pint for them.

"From the creamiest stout to the hoppiest IPA and the lightest pale ale, there are enough styles out there to suit all tastes and preferences.

"There is no one 'female palate'."

Related topics: Sport

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