Less than half of pub goers claim calorie labelling would influence food choices

By Stuart Stone contact

- Last updated on GMT

Healthy measure: 43% of those quizzed claim that claim calorie labelling on pub food would not influence their ordering habits (Image: Getty Images/Hispanolistic)
Healthy measure: 43% of those quizzed claim that claim calorie labelling on pub food would not influence their ordering habits (Image: Getty Images/Hispanolistic)

Related tags: Food, Health, Health and safety, Calorie labelling, Legislation, Gastropub

Just 39% of respondents to a recent survey believe that calorie labelling on pub and bar food menus would influence their meal choices when eating out.

According to data from global intelligence platform Streetbees, 43% of those quizzed claim that claim calorie labelling on pub food menus – a Government measure to tackle obesity – would not encourage them to change their ordering habits. 

Just under one-in-five (18%) of respondents claimed that they were “not sure” what impact such a measure would have while more than a third (39%) stated that calorie labelling would sway them towards healthier options while eating out.

As reported by The Morning Advertiser​, the introduction of mandatory calorie labelling will come into force in April 2022​ and would “badly damage the sector at a time when the focus must be squarely on recovery”, according to UKHospitality (UKH).

Younger diners more likely to change ordering habits 

According to Streetbees’ research, men are less likely than women to change their ordering habits as a result of calorie labelling on menus with 49% of male respondents claiming the new measure would not influence their choices compared to 41% of females quizzed. 

What’s more, those aged over 46-years-old are least likely to be swayed by calorie labelling according to Streetbees, with 45% claiming that such detail would not drive them away from higher-calorie meals versus 36% who said it would.

Additionally, younger diners appeared to be more susceptible to the influence of calorie labelling. 

While some 43% of respondents in the 18-25 age bracket claimed they would not be swayed by calorie details being published on menus – the same as counterparts in the 26-35 and 36-45 brackets – 39% said it would cause them to reconsider. 

Those aged between 26-35-years-old were, however, found to be most likely to alter their eating habits as a result of the new measure with 41% claiming calorie labelling would influence their order.

‘New costs’ on business 

The new rules, which will apply to businesses with 250 and over employees, will force businesses to spend cash on additional staff training.

UKH has written to public health minister Jo Churchill, calling for a minimum delay of six months in a bid to give businesses breathing space and a chance to get back on their feet after 16 months of closure and disrupted trading.

The trade body went on to state that a delay would allow firms time to fully engage details and have systems ready in place.

“The vast majority of operators are in survival mode and will be for the foreseeable future,” UKH chief executive Kate Nicholls said in June.

“We therefore, urge the Government to consider delaying the implementation of this legislation rather than layering on new costs for businesses in a sector that has been hardest hit by the pandemic and risks damaging business’ ability to invest and create jobs.”

Related topics: Food trends

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