Only 5.1% of customers understand the difference between 'no' and 'low' alcohol

By Rebecca Weller contact

- Last updated on GMT

Drinkaware's Adam Jones: Research has shown the terminology around alcohol-free and lower strength drinks isn’t always well understood
Drinkaware's Adam Jones: Research has shown the terminology around alcohol-free and lower strength drinks isn’t always well understood

Related tags: Low to no, Social responsibility, Drinkaware

Licensees have been urged to ensure customers understand the difference between ‘low’ alcohol and ‘no’ alcohol beverages with regards to ABV this January.

The appeal from Drinkaware comes after a 2021 Monitor report showed people had a poor understanding of alcohol-free and lower strength drinks. 

Only 5.1% of the 9,137 participants correctly identified what the labels of ‘alcohol-free’ and ‘low strength’ drinks meant in terms of ABV.

Drinkaware’s business development and partnerships director, Adam Jones, said: “For many of us, New Year represents a chance to set new goals or improve our health and wellbeing.

Appeal to customers 

“I have been delighted to see the on-trade stocking a wider range of alcohol-free or lower strength drinks than ever before, something that can directly appeal to customers looking to cut down in 2022.”

The terms low and no are often used together but represent quite different products and so Drinkaware recommended using low alcohol, lower strength, or alcohol-free descriptions to help consumers make the most informed decisions about their drinking.  

Drinks classified as alcohol-free may contain a small amount of alcohol but only at a strength of 0.05% or less, whereas reduced or lower strength drinks have an alcohol content lower than the average strength of a particular type of drink.

For example, wine with an ABV strength of 5.5%, would be a reduced alcohol wine, as opposed to a low alcohol wine.

Drinkaware can help

Drinkaware advised publicans to encourage or assist customers in enjoying a low or no alcohol pint at the pub by suggesting to those who want to cut down their alcohol consumption set goals to keep a track of progress or set a certain amount of drink free days during the week.

Jones added: “We know from our research the terminology around alcohol-free and lower strength drinks isn’t always well understood. That is just one place where Drinkaware’s guidance can help.”  

For more information, tips and advice visit drinkaware.co.uk​.

Related topics: Beer

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