Cost of a pint could be more than £10 by the end of the decade

By Rebecca Weller contact

- Last updated on GMT

Research from Admirals reveals effect of inflation on price of a pint: cost of a pint could rise to more than £10 by 2030 (Credit: Getty/ Nutthaseth Vanchaichana)
Research from Admirals reveals effect of inflation on price of a pint: cost of a pint could rise to more than £10 by 2030 (Credit: Getty/ Nutthaseth Vanchaichana)

Related tags: Finance, Beer, Inflation

An average a pint could cost more than £10 by the end of the decade, new research from marketing analysists Admirals has revealed.

Inflation has been predicted to rise to 7.25% by spring 2022, which means some places in the UK could be charging as much as £10.50 for a pint of beer by 2030.

Admiral market analyst Roberto Rivero said: “Soaring energy prices, labour shortages and the rising cost of raw materials are pushing up input costs for businesses which, in turn, is putting upward pressure on prices.

Likely to get worse before getting better

“Rising inflation should only be transitory until the economy is used to living with Covid, however, things are likely to get worse before getting better.

“If inflation continues to rise at a faster rate than wages, then the price of a pint would be the least of our concerns.”

The average price of a pint could rise to nearly £7 (£6.93) across the UK by 2030, if the inflation rate continues to stay at the same rate each year.

Pint prices across the UK

Location

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

UK

£3.96

£4.25

£4.56

£4.89

£5.24

£5.62

£6.03

£6.46

£6.93

London

£6.00

£6.44

£6.90

£7.40

£7.94

£8.51

£9.13

£9.79

£10.50

Edinburgh

£5.10

£5.47

£5.87

£6.29

£6.75

£7.24

£7.76

£8.32

£8.93

Brighton and Hove

£4.94

£5.30

£5.68

£6.09

£6.54

£7.01

£7.52

£8.06

£8.65

Bristol

£4.52

£4.85

£5.20

£5.58

£5.98

£6.41

£6.88

£7.38

£7.91

Oxford

£4.49

£4.82

£5.16

£5.54

£5.94

£6.37

£6.83

£7.33

£7.86

Liverpool

£4.48

£4.80

£5.15

£5.53

£5.93

£6.36

£6.82

£7.31

£7.84

Birmingham

£4.46

£4.78

£5.13

£5.50

£5.90

£6.33

£6.79

£7.28

£7.81

Belfast

£4.45

£4.77

£5.12

£5.49

£5.89

£6.31

£6.77

£7.26

£7.79

Newcastle upon Tyne

£4.33

£4.64

£4.98

£5.34

£5.73

£6.14

£6.59

£7.07

£7.58

Southampton

£4.31

£4.62

£4.96

£5.32

£5.70

£6.12

£6.56

£7.03

£7.54

Nottingham

£4.27

£4.58

£4.91

£5.27

£5.65

£6.06

£6.50

£6.97

£7.47

Manchester

£4.05

£4.34

£4.66

£5.00

£5.36

£5.75

£6.16

£6.61

£7.09

Reading

£3.97

£4.26

£4.57

£4.90

£5.25

£5.63

£6.04

£6.48

£6.95

Southend-on-Sea

£3.96

£4.25

£4.56

£4.89

£5.24

£5.62

£6.03

£6.46

£6.93

Northampton

£3.91

£4.19

£4.50

£4.82

£5.17

£5.55

£5.95

£6.38

£6.84

Glasgow

£3.88

£4.16

£4.46

£4.79

£5.13

£5.51

£5.90

£6.33

£6.79

Sheffield

£3.87

£4.15

£4.45

£4.77

£5.12

£5.49

£5.89

£6.32

£6.77

Coventry

£3.86

£4.14

£4.44

£4.76

£5.11

£5.48

£5.87

£6.30

£6.76

Leeds

£3.83

£4.11

£4.41

£4.72

£5.07

£5.43

£5.83

£6.25

£6.70

Aberdeen

£3.83

£4.11

£4.41

£4.72

£5.07

£5.43

£5.83

£6.25

£6.70

Plymouth

£3.69

£3.96

£4.24

£4.55

£4.88

£5.24

£5.62

£6.02

£6.46

Kingston upon Hull

£3.64

£3.90

£4.19

£4.49

£4.82

£5.17

£5.54

£5.94

£6.37

Stoke-on-Trent

£3.51

£3.76

£4.04

£4.33

£4.64

£4.98

£5.34

£5.73

£6.14

Cardiff

£3.42

£3.67

£3.93

£4.22

£4.52

£4.85

£5.20

£5.58

£5.99

Leicester

£3.26

£3.50

£3.75

£4.02

£4.31

£4.63

£4.96

£5.32

£5.71

Since the pandemic hit the UK’s public finances have been affected and, inflation rates have continued to rise.

As of December 2021, the rate was 5.4% and as of today (Tuesday 22 February) the average price of a pint across the UK was £3.96.

Hospitality could suffer 

If inflation does continue to rise along this trajectory, Brits could end up spending nearly £3k (£2,772) a year on beer by 2030, according to the research from Admiral, which looked at data from the top 25 cities in the UK including London, Manchester, Brighton, Liverpool, Cardiff, and Edinburgh. 

Rivero added: “The hospitality sector would likely suffer as people began to prioritise spending on essential items and, although many of us may think a pint of beer on a Friday night is essential, things like food and household goods will take priority for most.”

Related topics: Beer

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