Cellar to Glass: Four steps to a perfect pint

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Related tags: Cellar, Cooler, Glass

Step 1: cellar cooling • Cellar storage will cool kegs and casks down to 11 to 13 degrees C. This can take up to 48 hours so always allow...

Step 1: cellar cooling

• Cellar storage will cool kegs and casks down to 11 to 13 degrees C. This can take up to 48 hours so always allow sufficient stock for this to happen.

• Routine maintenance can reduce running costs - a typical cellar cooling unit can use 40 per cent more electricity if it has not been regularly serviced.

• Do not leave cellar doors open and do not install equipment like ice machines in the cellar as they generate heat.

• Good insulation of the cellar can also dramatically reduce the energy usage.

Step 2: remote cooling

Remote cooling is designed to take 12 degrees C products and cool them down to the correct dispense temperature. A well-looked-after cooler will run more efficiently and use less electricity. Do not block air flow to the remote cooler and if it is water based keep the water bath topped up.

Step 3: secondary cooling

Flash coolers - such as under-bar pods - can be used for delivering extra cold from a standard water-based system. They will run more efficiently if the grills are free from dust and dirt. You should also make sure there is good airflow around the unit and that the water bath is topped up. If you are using glycol and InnCool systems, secondary cooling is not required.

Step 4: glass temperature

The glass plays a large part in the final temperature and quality of the pint delivered. A glass will typically add at least 1 degree C to the temperature of the beer from the tap. If the glass is used straight from the dishwasher then this can be as much as 4 degrees C. So always use clean glasses which are no warmer than ambient temperature.

Related topics: Beer

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